Luke 8:22-39 (click to display NIV text)
May 26, 2013
Pastor Dwight A. Nelson

“Therefore, since we have been justified through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ . . .”

“One day Jesus said to his disciples, ‘Let us go over to the other side of the lake.’ So they got into a boat and set out.”

Jesus took his disciples on an intentional journey that would have a specific purpose in their lives. They needed to experience the authority of Jesus and the peace of Jesus. So he took them to places of fear and anxiety. He took them to the “other side of the lake.” This was Gentile country. It was the only time Jesus went there. It was a fearful place. Joel Green writes, “Jesus is way beyond the boundaries of acceptable Jewish behavior.” Read more

  • Corban Chang as he is Confirmed
  • Makayla Ramas as her parents, Mike and Debby, present her for Dedication
  • Pastoral Search Committee
  • Covenant Harbor and Covenant Point
  • Fritz and Barb Lansky
  • Community Christian Food Pantry and the many people served by it
  • The Vitality Home Meetings
  • Brent and Brittani Keller as Brent was recently diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma
  • Vernamae Juel, Kari Reid’s mom, as she begins cardiac rehab
  • Linda Lee and her family on the recent death of her father.

Luke 9:18-26 (click to display NIV text)
May 19, 2013
Pastor Dwight A. Nelson

But what about you?’ He asked. ‘Who do you say that I am?’ Peter answered, ‘God’s Messiah.’”

The question “Who do you say that I am?” arises out of prayer. Luke tells us that Jesus was praying in a private place, and the disciples were with him, presumably praying too. It was out of that experience that Jesus knows the time is right to ask the central question of faith and discipleship. The crowds of people who have been listening to Jesus and watching Jesus have been coming up with their answers. They are looking backward to Elijah and to prophets from the Old Testament. If only we could go back to another day, to a time of great leaders. If only we could see John again, who was so suddenly and brutally executed. But Peter’s answer looks forward. Jesus is the long-hoped-for Messiah, a new voice who comes from God’s future, God’s kingdom.

As much as I respect the faith and courage of Elijah, and as much as I understand John’s call to repentance and feel its conviction, I am thankful for all the years that I have known Jesus as Lord. I have not sought to walk with Elijah or John. I have walked with Jesus, and in Jesus the Messiah I find grace, a deep love, a strong call, and always a future hope. Read more

Luke 9:18-26 (click to display NIV text)
May 19, 2013
Pastor Dwight A. Nelson

But what about you?’ He asked. ‘Who do you say that I am?’ Peter answered, ‘God’s Messiah.’”

The question “Who do you say that I am?” arises out of prayer. Luke tells us that Jesus was praying in a private place, and the disciples were with him, presumably praying too. It was out of that experience that Jesus knows the time is right to ask the central question of faith and discipleship. The crowds of people who have been listening to Jesus and watching Jesus have been coming up with their answers. They are looking backward to Elijah and to prophets from the Old Testament. If only we could go back to another day, to a time of great leaders. If only we could see John again, who was so suddenly and brutally executed. But Peter’s answer looks forward. Jesus is the long-hoped-for Messiah, a new voice who comes from God’s future, God’s kingdom.

As much as I respect the faith and courage of Elijah, and as much as I understand John’s call to repentance and feel its conviction, I am thankful for all the years that I have known Jesus as Lord. I have not sought to walk with Elijah or John. I have walked with Jesus, and in Jesus the Messiah I find grace, a deep love, a strong call, and always a future hope. Read more

  • Our Mothers and Grandmothers
  • The Pastoral Search Committee
  • Covenant Harbor and Covenant Point as they prepare for the summer camping programs
  • Fritz and Barb Lansky
  • Community Christian Food Pantry and the many people served by it
  • The Vitality Home Meetings
  • Brent and Brittani Keller as Brent was recently diagnosed with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma
  • The Bretzman Family as they honor Randy’s father, Carl.

Luke 8:1-21 (click to display NIV text)
May 12, 2013
Pastor Dwight A. Nelson

“The seed on good soil stands for those with a noble and good heart, who hear the word, retain it, and by persevering produce a crop.”

Years ago, Woody Hayes, the famous football coach, said that “When you throw the football, only three things can happen and two of them are bad.” So he kept the ball safely on the ground. But as the years have gone by, more and more coaches have devised ways to throw the ball as much as possible, and today they seem to be the successful ones.

Jesus said that when God sows his word in hearts, four things can happen, and three of them are bad. It can fall on the hard path, the rocky ground, or the soil with weeds and thorns. But God sows as much seed as possible, in as many ways as possible. Jesus gives his life so that people might become good soil. The good soil is not of our own making. It is created by grace, by the cross and resurrection of Jesus. Read more

Luke 8:1-21 (click to display NIV text)
May 12, 2013
Pastor Dwight A. Nelson

“The seed on good soil stands for those with a noble and good heart, who hear the word, retain it, and by persevering produce a crop.”

Years ago, Woody Hayes, the famous football coach, said that “When you throw the football, only three things can happen and two of them are bad.” So he kept the ball safely on the ground. But as the years have gone by, more and more coaches have devised ways to throw the ball as much as possible, and today they seem to be the successful ones.

Jesus said that when God sows his word in hearts, four things can happen, and three of them are bad. It can fall on the hard path, the rocky ground, or the soil with weeds and thorns. But God sows as much seed as possible, in as many ways as possible. Jesus gives his life so that people might become good soil. The good soil is not of our own making. It is created by grace, by the cross and resurrection of Jesus. Read more

Luke 7:18-23 (click to display NIV text)
May 5, 2013
Pastor Dwight A. Nelson

“Go back and report to John what you have seen and heard. The blind receive sight, the lame walk, those who have leprosy are cleansed, the deaf hear, the dead are raised and the good news is proclaimed to the poor.”

John the Baptist announced the coming of the Messiah, calling people to repentance. Later he baptized Jesus and affirmed him as the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world. Those who heard the message of John and took it to heart were ready to receive Jesus and follow him. Then John was thrown into prison by Herod. It was at this time that John sent some of his disciples to Jesus to ask him if he was the Messiah, or should they wait for another to come. It is not clear whether John was expressing doubt in Jesus, or whether he just desired a word of clarification for himself or maybe for his disciples. What is clear is that he wants to know from Jesus what it is that the Messiah is to do. Read more