[embedit snippet=”twice-challenge-story”]

Once upon a time there was a young boy who loved sailboats.  He would sit at the harbor for hours just watching the boats bob in the water, or sail out on amazing adventures, or return to the dock and to home.  So one Christmas, under the tree, wrapped in beautiful golden paper, the boy found a sailboat model kit.  He was so excited that he left the other presents unwrapped and began right away to build his model sailboat.  It took him 4 months of painstaking gluing, tying, painting, waiting, but by late April the boat was ready.  He painted his name on the side and walked carefully down to the creek behind his house for the boat’s maiden voyage.  Barely able to contain his excitement, the boy gently set the boat in the water, and whooped with joy when the boat slowly began to sail its way down the creek.

But with the melting snow of spring, the creek was a bit larger, and a bit rougher, and a bit faster than the boy had remembered from the fall.  Soon, the little boat began to pick up speed as it drifted to the middle of the creek, and soon the creek had grown into a small river.  As his fear rose higher and higher, the boat began to outpace him and soon it was all he could do to keep up with his precious treasure.  And eventually, the boy couldn’t run anymore.  With tears in his eyes, he watched as the boat sailed down the river and out of sight.  For a month the boy searched for his boat, but by late May, he realized that the boat was gone.  Sadly the boy finished his school year and summer came without its usual joy, for his boat was gone and the boy was heartbroken.

In the middle of June, the boy was kicking a pebble down the main street of his town when he came upon the window of the resale shop.  Looking up for just a moment, the boy was shocked to see a sailboat in the window of the shop.  But more than just a sailboat, it was his very own sailboat.  With renewed joy he ran into the shop and explained to the shopowner that the boat in the window was his, even showing that his name was on the hull.  “I’m sorry, son, but I can’t just give you the boat because you say it’s yours,” the owner replied.  “If you want it, you’ll have to pay for it like everyone else.”  When the boy found out it was worth $100, he resolved to do whatever it took to buy that boat back.  So the boy hired himself out for every odd job he could find.  He walked dogs, mowed lawns, delivered papers, cleaned windows… and by the end of August, the boy had earned the $100.  Returning to the store, he proudly put the money on the counter and tenderly took the little boat in his hands and walked home.  As he walked along, he talked to his beloved little boat.  “Well, little boat, we are together again.  First I made you, and then I bought you.  Now you are twice mine.”

[embedit snippet=”twice-challenge-story”]

Once upon a time there was a young boy who loved sailboats.  He would sit at the harbor for hours just watching the boats bob in the water, or sail out on amazing adventures, or return to the dock and to home.  So one Christmas, under the tree, wrapped in beautiful golden paper, the boy found a sailboat model kit.  He was so excited that he left the other presents unwrapped and began right away to build his model sailboat.  It took him 4 months of painstaking gluing, tying, painting, waiting, but by late April the boat was ready.  He painted his name on the side and walked carefully down to the creek behind his house for the boat’s maiden voyage.  Barely able to contain his excitement, the boy gently set the boat in the water, and whooped with joy when the boat slowly began to sail its way down the creek.

But with the melting snow of spring, the creek was a bit larger, and a bit rougher, and a bit faster than the boy had remembered from the fall.  Soon, the little boat began to pick up speed as it drifted to the middle of the creek, and soon the creek had grown into a small river.  As his fear rose higher and higher, the boat began to outpace him and soon it was all he could do to keep up with his precious treasure.  And eventually, the boy couldn’t run anymore.  With tears in his eyes, he watched as the boat sailed down the river and out of sight.  For a month the boy searched for his boat, but by late May, he realized that the boat was gone.  Sadly the boy finished his school year and summer came without its usual joy, for his boat was gone and the boy was heartbroken.

In the middle of June, the boy was kicking a pebble down the main street of his town when he came upon the window of the resale shop.  Looking up for just a moment, the boy was shocked to see a sailboat in the window of the shop.  But more than just a sailboat, it was his very own sailboat.  With renewed joy he ran into the shop and explained to the shopowner that the boat in the window was his, even showing that his name was on the hull.  “I’m sorry, son, but I can’t just give you the boat because you say it’s yours,” the owner replied.  “If you want it, you’ll have to pay for it like everyone else.”  When the boy found out it was worth $100, he resolved to do whatever it took to buy that boat back.  So the boy hired himself out for every odd job he could find.  He walked dogs, mowed lawns, delivered papers, cleaned windows… and by the end of August, the boy had earned the $100.  Returning to the store, he proudly put the money on the counter and tenderly took the little boat in his hands and walked home.  As he walked along, he talked to his beloved little boat.  “Well, little boat, we are together again.  First I made you, and then I bought you.  Now you are twice mine.”

Greetings LCC Parents!

Happy Pentecost! Here is this week’s issue of the Drive Home Newsletter! Click on this link to download it: The Drive Home Newsletter 5/15/16
GOD Bless,
Bobby

Our high school youth recently attended the annual OneLife retreat at Covenant Point.  The video that accompanied their storysharing in worship is below.  We hope you’ll enjoy it! [embedit snippet=”onelife2016video”]

Today’s devotional comes from one of Jim Hawkinson’s blog post of 5 years ago.  

Shattered shards of clay pots, that’s all we really are.  Knowing it deep within and being reminded often – whether in dreams by night or everyday events – there is no hiding from our own brokenness as human beings.  Is that why the pervasive anxieties all around are so hard to truly face, much less absorb?  The Old Testament Nathan’s prophecy to King David (2 Samuel 12) was hardly spent on him.  It continues through the ages, coming down on us as well:  “You are the man!”

One can, of course, like so many keep doing, run and hide from it all, proudly pretending innocence.  We see it all the time in others and know it in ourselves, deep within.  Ought we not rather thank God that He persists in calling the likes of Nathan to break through our hidden nature and confront us with our sin?

What’s so amazing about grace is that the God who thus probes our depths does so not to destroy our lives but to recreate them from within.  Stay up on your own high hill and you will be brought low.  But receive him in the valleys of your life and you will be exalted.

Read the hymn by Joseph Hart (1712-1766) below – even sing it to the Beach Spring tune if you can. Allow it to illumine the darkness within you.  And let it awaken the joyous reminder that God sent His Son to make us whole.

Come, you sinners, poor and needy, bruised and broken by the fall;
Jesus ready standsto save you, full of pard’ning grace for all.
He is able, He is able, He is willing, doubt no more;
He is able, He is able, He is willing, doubt no more;

Let not conscience make you linger, nor of fitness fondly dream;
All that He requires of sinners is to turn and trust in Him.
He will save you, He will save you, ‘tis the Gospel’s constant theme.
He will save you, He will save you, ‘tis the Gospel’s constant theme.

Lo! Th’ incarnate God, ascended, pleads the merit of His blood;
Venture on Him, venture wholly, let no other trust intrude;
None but Jesus, none but Jesus can do helpless sinners good.
None but Jesus, none but Jesus can do helpless sinners good.